What is a stock split?

 A stock split is a type of corporate action that occurs when a company's board of directors decides to divide the company's outstanding shares into a larger or smaller number of shares. Splits are a change in the number of outstanding shares of a company’s stock without a change in shareholders' ownership percentage in the company.

For example, with a 2:1 split, a client will receive 2 shares for each share owned prior to and through the open on the security's split ex-dividend (or “effective”) date.

There are two types of stock splits:

  • Forward splits are the division of the outstanding shares of a corporation into a larger number of shares. For example, in a three-for-one stock split (3:1), each old share is now equal to three shares. The price per share would also go down. In this example, if the pre-split share was worth $9, the post-split share would be worth $3.
  • Reverse splits are a reduction in the number of outstanding shares. For example, if you had 300 shares of XYZ and there was a one-to-three reverse split (1:3), your old 300 shares would now be equal to 100 shares. The price of each new share would also be higher. If the pre-split share was worth $2, the post-split share would be worth $6.